Adventures in Signal Processing and Open Science

Tag: open source

It’s all about replication

ReScience logoA new journal appeared recently in the scientific publishing landscape: ReScienceannounced at the recent EuroSciPy 2015 conference. The journal has been founded by Nicolas Rougier and Konrad Hinsen. This journal is remarkable in several ways, so remarkable in fact that I could not resist accepting their offer to become associate editor for the journal.

So how does this journal stand out from the crowd? First of all it is about as open as it gets. The entire publishing process is completely transparent – from first submission through review to final publication. Second, the journal platform is based entirely on GitHub, the code repository home to a plethora of open source projects. This is part of what enables the journal to be so open about the entire publishing process. Third, the journal does not actually publish original research – there are plenty of those already. Instead, ReScience focuses entirely on replications of already published computational science.

As has been mentioned by numerous people before me, when dealing with papers based on computational science it is not really enough to review the paper in the classical sense to ensure that the results can be trusted (this not only a problem of computational science, but this is the particular focus of ReScience). Results need to be replicated to validate them and this is what ReScience addresses.

Many of us probably know it: we are working on a new paper of our own and we need to replicate the results of some previous paper that we wish to compare our results against. Except for that comparison, this is essentially lost work after you get your paper published. Others looking at the original paper whose results you replicated may not be aware that anyone replicated these results. Now you can publish the replication of these previous results as well and get credit for it. At the same time you benefit the authors of the original results that you have replicated by helping validate their research.

The process of submitting your work to ReScience is described on their website along with the review process and the roles of editors and reviewers. So if you have replicated someone else’s computational work, go ahead and publish it in ReScience. If it is in the signal processing area I will be happy to take your submission through the publishing process.

Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

Our new software metapaper Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images has just been published in Journal of Open Research Software. The paper describes our new software package Magni:

Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also provides researchers in compressed sensing with a selection of algorithms for reconstructing undersampled general images, and offers a consistent and rigorous way to efficiently evaluate the researchers own developed reconstruction algorithms in terms of phase transitions. The package also serves as a convenient platform for researchers in compressed sensing aiming at obtaining a high degree of reproducibility of their research.

The software itself is on GitHub as well as on Aalborg University’s repository: DOI 10.5278/VBN/MISC/Magni

Go ahead and check it out if you are into compressed sensing or atomic force microscopy. Pull requests welcome if you have ideas.

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