iTWIST’16 Keynote Speakers: Gerhard Wunder

iTWIST’16 is starting less than two weeks from now and we have 46 participants coming to Aalborg for the event (and I can still squeeze in a couple more – single-day registrations possible – so contact me if you are interested; only 4 places left before I have to order a bigger bus for the banquet dinner 🙂 ).

wunderOur next keynote speaker in line for the event is Gerhard Wunder, head of the Heisenberg Communications and Information Theory Group. Gerhard Wunder recently came to Freie Universität Berlin from Technische Universität Berlin. Dr. Wunder is currently heading two research projects: the EU FP7 project 5GNOW and PROPHYLAXE funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research and is a member of the management team of the EU H2020 FANTASTIC-5G project. Currently he receives funding in the German DFG priority programs SPP 1798 CoSIP (Compressed Sensing in Information Processing), and the upcoming SPP 1914 Cyber-Physical Networking.

Gerhard Wunder conducts research in wireless communication technologies and has recently started introducing principles of sparsity and compressed sensing into wireless communication. As an example of this, Gerhard Wunder recently published the paper “Sparse Signal Processing Concepts for Efficient 5G System Design” in IEEE Access together with Holger Boche, Thomas Strohmer, and Peter Jung.

At the coming iTWIST workshop, Gerhard Wunder is going to introduce us to the use of compressive sensing in random access medium access control (MAC), applied in massive machine-type communications – a major feature being extensively researched for coming 5G communication standards. The abstract of Dr. Wunder’s talk reads:

Compressive Coded Random Access for 5G Massive Machine-type Communication

Massive Machine-type Communication (MMC) within the Internet of Things (IoT) is an important future market segment in 5G, but not yet efficiently supported in cellular systems. Major challenge in MMC is the very unfavorable payload to control overhead relation due to small messages and oversized Medium Access (MAC) procedures. In this talk we follow up on a recent concept called Compressive Coded Random Access (CCRA) combining advanced MAC protocols with Compressed Sensing (CS) based multiuser detection. Specifically, we introduce a “one shot” random access procedure where users can send a message without a priori synchronizing with the network. In this procedure a common overloaded control channel is used to jointly detect sparse user activity and sparse channel profiles. In the same slot, data is detected based on the already available information. In the talk we show how CS algorithms and in particular the concept of hierarchical sparsity can be used to design efficient and scalable access protocols. The CCRA concept is introduced in full detail and further generalizations are discussed. We present algorithms and analysis that proves the additional benefit of the concept.

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